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Approaching a New Water


salokcinnodrog
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i would pack the car back up and go home, sounds like a right pain in the testies to be honest, sounds challenging, but only due to the rules, guess its a club lake?

Membership available to all who apply and come up with the money :wink:

 

 

I gave you the scenario as basically it is what many or even most Carp Anglers find week-in week-out. :!:

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polaroids on, up a tree and watch. wait for patrol routes to become apparent and drop walnut sized bags of your bait as "chops" along the path......probably wouldnt fish in earnest for the first day or two, would be busy doing above and also working around with a grubber lead for signs of bloodworm beds etc and general topography.....then be setting about freelining for those cruisers if possible.....if not, then margin traps on slack lines and no alarms at the point they first call back into the "margin"

Would also make myself busy having a look whats living in the bushes and banks too, to give yourself an Idea of what naturals are falling in around your margin spots and will therefore be readily taken

 

Im aware this may sound like a long drawn out effort just to wet a line...............but in general I tend to be fishing 24 hrs ahead of myself sometimes more (unless stalking)

 

great answer Goblin - kind of an extended version of my quote "look for signs of fish etc" lol :roll::roll::wink::wink:

 

but i have a good idea to add to yours, take kid brother or similar with you - send them out to do that while you kick back with a good book and a beer/cuppa :twisted::twisted::twisted:8)8)8)

 

being that my kid brother is 38 and married....I dare say his mrs may grumble :wink: .....aside from that I hate company whilst fishing (unless on a social) :wink:

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polaroids on, up a tree and watch. wait for patrol routes to become apparent and drop walnut sized bags of your bait as "chops" along the path......probably wouldnt fish in earnest for the first day or two, would be busy doing above and also working around with a grubber lead for signs of bloodworm beds etc and general topography.....then be setting about freelining for those cruisers if possible.....if not, then margin traps on slack lines and no alarms at the point they first call back into the "margin"

Would also make myself busy having a look whats living in the bushes and banks too, to give yourself an Idea of what naturals are falling in around your margin spots and will therefore be readily taken

 

Im aware this may sound like a long drawn out effort just to wet a line...............but in general I tend to be fishing 24 hrs ahead of myself sometimes more (unless stalking)

 

great answer Goblin - kind of an extended version of my quote "look for signs of fish etc" lol :roll::roll::wink::wink:

 

but i have a good idea to add to yours, take kid brother or similar with you - send them out to do that while you kick back with a good book and a beer/cuppa :twisted::twisted::twisted:8)8)8)

 

being that my kid brother is 38 and married....I dare say his mrs may grumble :wink: .....aside from that I hate company whilst fishing (unless on a social) :wink:

 

fair enough - a 16 year old bro is still under my thumb ..! (not really but would be nice)

 

never said i was gonna fish with him... just get him to do my dirty work lol 8)8)8)8)

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Nick....you asked what would our approach be.....not guess what you did!!!! :lol::lol::wink:

 

Still stand by original thoughts as what I would do :wink:

Del,

You reading my mind again? I was going to post exactly where the clue was as to how I did approach it.

Pretty fair answer you gave as well, although I'm impatient, and can't normally discipline myself to wait 24hours. :shock::roll::wink:

 

 

It amuses me that it is the "long time" anglers who have come up with ideas and an approach plan. Maybe I seem to have scared some of the younger ones off "the lake" :shock::roll::twisted:

 

Just getting to look for fish was the idea, and if not understand, at least accept that the weather and wind will have an effect on the fish and where they may be.

 

I've never really gone by the idea that there are difficult lakes as I'm always working on location, looking for fish, with Binoculars or by plain eyesight, listening to others on the lake, as well as making up my own ideas and plans as I go along. Locating the fish is to me the important part of any trip. I (we) get it wrong at times, I'm not stupid enough to figure that I'm infallible, yet once I have the location at least partly twigged then I can "cobble" along the rest. Its then a simple (?) case of working on what they want to eat and how to present the bait in the right place.

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My first step would be to try and obtain some infomation before i even went there, for my first session i would travel light not staying in one swim to long if the lake is not that busy, but take a marker rod. And i would climb some trees and take my binoculars even if the lake isnt that big ive found them to be still very usefull and you can also spy on the other anglers and see what bait there using :lol:

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This might be a longish one.

So to turn to a lake blind. I guess this will be a long term campain.

I would do the walk round to start with, glasses and the odd climb of a tree if possible.

Then as this being the first of many trips, i would set up in a swim on instinct ( which on occasions has backfired), then have a quick lead around and pick my spots.

When fishing heavy pressured waters i tend to find that my eyes and ears are key, as well as watching the water watching other anglers, where there fishing and what they catch is all usefull info on a first trip. (i dont care what baits or tactics there using i'll find that out for myself at a later date).

Example i fished catch22 for the first time in 13 years a month ago its pick and mix with the swims due to the pressure. i blanked and i had 2 bars in front of me and so did 6 other poeple down that end. But i clocked where all the fish had come out over the 2 days. Once i'd packed up i went for a walk around to have a look ( i hadn't done cause all the swims that end had gone), 20 yards out very thick weed, bumped in to a mate there fished to it, he had 10 fish smallest 25lb to 29lb. So i learnt something about that water even though i blanked.

As for baits on a first trip i would use my fav good food bollie with bags and stringers. The other rod will have corn/maize with my hot choc bread crumb ground bait in a bag. For me this will give me a idea of what else might be in the lake. (or to see what else iam up against). With using pva bags or mesh your not restricted with one spot it allows you to move it about a bit, as on some lakes i've experienced bream at 3 rod lengths come in a bit and your on to the carp etc.

Oh and if there wern't a baiting ban the corn/maize rod would be on a bed of hemp and corn/maize

 

The second trip is another story :lol:

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Ok, I was being particularly wicked when I started this thread up. I'd just seen another "Difficult Water" or "Difficult Lake" thread, and really wanted to see how many of you would approach a new lake, what ideas you would use, what steps you would take to learn about the water.

I was going to leave the reply a bit longer and make for some waiting, but since I'm off fishing again Wednesday I thought I'd best give you a nearly sensible reply.

 

The lake I described is the Hertfordshire water I joined this year, and the honest answer as to how I approached the lake is in Catch Reports Carp, so I don't reckon I need to reprint the whole thing again :wink: (Thank god I hear :shock::roll: )

 

 

The first time anyone approaches a lake it can be an eye-opener, daunting even, but the majority of anglers all fish new waters sometime in their lives, and this is often how it happens. Not all waters are heavily pressured, and some are even more so. Yet out of all of them the most important thing on any water is LOCATION.

 

I mentioned an island in the original post, I didn't say that it is only accessible from 2 possibly swims, and 1 side is currently unfishable due to Lily pads. I also didn't mention that 1 of the sleeping anglers was in 1 of those swims. As you can see up the thread from adds I put in, in additional posts, I hadn't given full information. Kind of messed up some of the replies didn't it? A bit unfair really on some of the answers received!

 

Its great learning from a forum, it can and will teach you aspects or ideas that maybe you simply had missed or overlooked, yet unless you have a full picture it can be so misleading, the answers you get may be at totally crossed purposes to reality. Opinions you receive will differ with what you know is happening to you simply because every water is different.

 

At some point in your fishing you WILL struggle, I have and at times still do :wink: , and I bet everyone else on the forum can say the same.

 

I can say this though, the more time you spend learning a water, and about the fish, their behaviour, their feeding, how they behave, their patrol routes, then the more you will catch. It doesn't always happen first time, or 21st time, but you spend time watching, learning planning and most of all LOCATING the carp you will succeed.

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  • 2 months later...

Y'know, this is a very interesting thread for me as it's what i was faced with as a newbie carper on a lake i joined a couple of weeks ago.

Now, i like to do a 12-hr night stint as it fits in with my busy lifestyle without annoying the wife, just scarper on a Fri night.

This lake has carp from 15lb to 32ish lb, mostly low twenties in fact. All small fish and small carp have been netted i believe leaving these big lumps floating about, word has it about 150 of them, but i'm not so sure!

Chap i met when i got there first visit said he'd blanked 3 times so far and seemed bemused by the place, onto the lake that night i went with the place to myself.

I worked away with PVA bags but blanked too, not one knock on the buzzers all night. I thought ok, next week i'll locate myself differently and work harder attracting the fish.

Turned up the following week and the place was nearly rammed, much to my suprise. There were two guys on the two swims that i had envisaged getting on myself, and access to the point where i wanted to cast was now limited, but it was turning cold and i had the wind blowing to my swim so i remained positive.

 

Now, my problematic evening i felt was made worse when i saw these two guys using a big flashing bait boat with fish finder, throwing out 4kilo of bait at a time. They'd been there for two days already and pulled out a 25lb beauty just before i got there. That night i tried the margin and went to the deep channel in the middle as it was cold but didn't get any action whatsoever! These others missed two, pulled out a 15lb and 20-odd lb overnight and were the only ones to catch on the lake out of myself and 8 others.

 

Thing is, i drove off thinking i never stood a chance against those boys and wasted the overnight fee.

I'd like any ideas anyone has to beat them! This place is a membershipped day-ticket. About 4 acres, no overhanging trees as such, small sections of reed around the place and a kind of jetty which has an electric pylon on it which juts into the water, sort of a feature! HELP..

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  • 4 weeks later...

Ive only just noticed this thread. You mentioned having a walk round in close season Nick, on the day i turn up to fish i would try and get myself in a peg where i saw fish/or signs of fish on that day i walked round as a starting point. If pva and stringers were the only way of getting bait about ( even though i dont think you`ve mentioned a spod being not allowed, not that i would on a 2 acre water) id feed hemp and other paricles in the margin for one rod beings as though they might not see much of this if its all about pva. I wouldnt personally be bothered about local bait company or what it is thats going in as id have my own favourite boilies with me which id have more confidence in then a new bait. Id chuck a rod to the edge of the lilies with a handfull of freebies on the 2nd and probabaly throw a pop-up about on the third. Then through the day id watch the water constantly for signs of fish and make a mental note for next time i was there and try and find where they spend most of their time. Others have said how they wouldnt wet a line for the first how ever long but for me and the limited time i get to go id still have the rods out whilst learning about any new place, might bring you a lucky fish plus i might not get to go again for another month or something if something was to come up. That would pretty much be my first day on a new pool, i wouldnt marker or spod straight away as on pools this size ive known it to absolutely ruin your chances of anything and like i said id be fishing from day one so wouldnt want to shoot myself in the foot, then, enjoy the place

 

 

 

Forgot about the 2 rod limit. id do 2 of those 3 things i said :lol:

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  • 4 months later...
  • 2 months later...
connord91

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Joined: 11 Jun 2010

Posts: 7

Location: wirral

 

Posted: 18th Jun 2010 00:53 Post subject: how do you apparoach a new water?

 

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i am new to carp fishing as i have been converted from pole fishing and finding the change hard going as carping is in a totally different league.

 

i have still yet to learn a routine when it comes to fishing new waters. i email as many people as i can but the info i get back is pretty sparse and basic...pretty useless really. so far i have only fished the one new water and found that trail and error paid off but not until during the night which is when the fish started feeding. i f i had known this, i wouldnt have turned up at 8 am. but i suppose this gave me a chance to chuck aload of freebies around during the day for when they started feeding.

 

would just like to see what you lot of seasoned carp anglers get up to when faced with a new water and how you approach it???

 

hopefully i will be able to put this into practice for my 48hr session down at llyn y gors on wednesday and start to build a regular routine to use on new waters.

 

willi4692

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Joined: 15 Jun 2008

Posts: 47

 

 

Posted: 18th Jun 2010 01:12 Post subject:

 

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Same as every session have a walk round and see if you can find some fish. If you can find some carp you stand a much improved chance of getting a bite. To find out what your fishing over trap you line with your finger just before the rig hits the water and hold it tight until it hits the bottom. If you get a hard donk likely to be on gravel if you get a soft landing its either weed or silt. Cast over the fish and reel back into them, a lead landing on their heads will only spook them. If as you say you dont get bites in the day have a lead around or play around with a marker float set-up find some features, like gullys, silt patches, weed beds, gravel bars etc. Take note of these draw a map of the lake and mark the features and depths etc this will be your guide for where to fish every time you visit the lake. Bait wise for a new venue always take boilies, carp are carp they all eat boilies, mainline cell or pulse as well as nash scopex squid liver plus never fail on any venue.

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  • 2 years later...

Well the time has come for a change after a sad incident this year on Brackens Pool.

 

On the same ticket for Brackens Nazeing Meads are another couple of waters, The North, South and Central Lagoons.

 

In the past while fishing Brackens Pool I had already gotten some interest in the South and Central lagoons, and knew when I felt that I had done all I could on Brackens I would move onto the other venues, so I have already had a walk around them as few times, and seen a few fish.

 

The challenges themselves are a bit different, a lot larger, and the dreaded Crayfish, but I have found a bit of information about where I'm going next.

 

I have dug up as much information as I can, and already spoken to a few anglers who fish there. I even found out an internet article (someone on here kindly posted the link, THANKS).

 

So how do you go about approaching a new water?

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My approach is always the same for any water, look, look, look and look again.

 

I tend to spend the first few days with the gear spending most of its time in the car. I climb trees and look to see if I can find anything and then I try to follow them. This hopefully works out some form of patrol route and may reveal what sort of areas they feed in. At this time of year I will take a bucket of floaters around with me and see if I can get anything to take some bait off the top, should of course I find some carp.

 

As we all know, the most important thing is to fish where the fish are. If they're not there you won't catch them. So my approach is always to try and learn as much about them before I start as possible.

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