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Longbows df which test curve


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Hi guys

Just hoping somebody out there owns a set or 3 of these rods and can recommend a test curve.

2.75lb. 3lb. 3.5lb. Are the three in which I'm looking at.

My fishing varies in med to long range. Weedy or snag free etc so really unsure which tc

 

Heard these are an all through action rod so maybe the lower tc 2.75 will b too floppy and I should go for the 3.5 ?

Anyway really hope you can help

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Carpmachine is the longbow expert so im sure he'll be along shortly :wink:

 

By the way how long range is long range ?

There arent many waters in the uk where a 2.75 tc wont suffice .

Depends on the rods action but thats where CM will help .

Personally i find the fight more fun with the lighter test curves :)

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Thank mate look forward to hopefully hearing from him.

Well I say long range I'm more med range than anything.

 

I no what your saying on the 2.75 tc being plenty but I have heard (how true I don't no) that the longbow 2.75 is very floppy for a 2.75 rod.

 

Maybe say the 3.5 will be ok and not a broom stick ?

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Ok. Will take a look at the greys aswell.. Do really like the daiwa rods look tho aswell.

I will need to get myself to a tackle shop and have a feel my nearest shop would be sheltons of peterbough...

 

I no they stock them because seen them in there before.

Also like the look of the infinty df rods but they are like £280 per rod maybe a bit to much when I can do the same with the longbow

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What are the cerbera rods like would you no ? This name does pop up a lot

harrison rod mate hand built in England .

I've got to agree if spending that sort of money would definitely be looking for custom made rods

 

And I can personally recommend the torrix in 3.25 lb as a very good if not one of the best all around rod out there .

Edited by chillfactor
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harrison rod mate hand built in England .

I've got to agree if spending that sort of money would definitely be looking for custom made rods

And I can personally recommend the torrix in 3.25 lb as a very good if not one of the best all around rod out there .

Yep heard of the torrix . You would recommend 3.25lb then ? Think they was £270

 

What about the cerbera rods just seen them £200 in 3lb or 3.25lb

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In the torrix blank yes I would recommend 3.25 lb .

The problem is in other blanks 3.25 will feel different so can't recommend that test curve across the board .

The cerbera is a new rod harrison have started making giving you high performance for a little less cost, go on the harrison website and have a read they explain there range of rods on there mate :wink:

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as regards cerberas if you were lumping pva bags i would go for the 3 and a quarter if not the 3 will suffice.agree as regards the torrix the 3 and a quarter torrix is regarded as a great all rounder.one thing we will all agree on is if at all possible get yourself to a tackle shop to be sure you get what feels right for you.enjoy your new rods whichever way you go :P  

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Is there anybody out there who can explain all this test curve business ?

How can , for example , a 3.5lb tc in one brand of rod be deemed suitable for the same "job" as a , for example , 2.75tc in another brand ?

 

It really is a totally open ended question isnt it ?

I mean to say , everyone is going to recommend the test curve of their own rods arent they ?

 

What is the definitive answer to the question " which test curve should i buy in the Fred Bloggs range of rods ?"....

 

Confused of Essex .

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Is there anybody out there who can explain all this test curve business ?

How can , for example , a 3.5lb tc in one brand of rod be deemed suitable for the same "job" as a , for example , 2.75tc in another brand ?

 

It really is a totally open ended question isnt it ?

I mean to say , everyone is going to recommend the test curve of their own rods arent they ?

 

What is the definitive answer to the question " which test curve should i buy in the Fred Bloggs range of rods ?"....

 

Confused of Essex .

 

The test curve is teh amount of weight it takes on the end of the rod, to bend the rod through 90 degrees. so with a 3lb test curve, some rods with 3 lb on the tip will bend the whole way through the rod, some rods will bend 90 degrees in just the last few feet. Test curve alone means jack ship. 

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Tim no 1 rod will be best at all the jobs you need a rod to do ... but people who think higher test curve rods than 2.75 don't bend are obviously not talking from experience . It's more to do with the action along with the test curve .

Like I said a 3.25 Torrix is a cracking all round rod my 2.75 daiwa rods wouldn't do the job I Need the torrix for on some waters but will happily use my torrix on all the waters I fish .

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The test curve of any rod, is usually the amount of force required to pull the rod into a quarter bend, obviously if you intend to cast miles with heavy weights, low end test curve rods will bend to early into the cast thus absorbing the energy, the counter argument is that they are very unforgiving at short range. My 3.5 Hutchies have pulled more hooks than George Clooney pulled birds. Other factors come into play regarding stiffness, the quality and taper of the blank plus its length, as Chilly says , his torrixs at 3.25 are still forgiving, but cheaper rods may have much thicker blanks and be very stiff at the same TC, the actions per manufacture will differ due to the way the rod is constructed, bigger rings can soften a rods action, but the blank is the key factor. Unless you need rods for a special purpose, 2.75 is the universal soldier.

Thank you Phil and CM for those explanations , i have read and had it explained to me before only this time i managed to understand :)

 

So are we saying that we get what we pay for ?

 

Phil , can you use your rods as an example mate ?

What can your torrix' acheive that your 2.75 daiwa's couldnt ?

 

I love my 2.75's . I cant imagine my fishing without them tbh and the only thing i wouldnt be confident in would be their ability to cast heavy leads to the horizon .

 

Having said that , somebody with decent technique may be able to , i dont know.

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You can put a lot more pressure and 'bully' a fish out of weed with a lighter test curve that bends, than a stiff rod that doesn't. All IMO of course.

Thats an interesting opinion Milky . I dont get the opportunity to test that theory cos i dont fish a weedy lake ( though that may change ).

 

My first thought were No you're wrong , surely a stiffer " stronger " rod would do that job better BUT thinking about it , you could be quite right , a rod with more "give" and a more forgiving nature could well be the way to go.

Nice one :wink:

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Might be usefull reading from Harrison's ,the bottom link is the whole article

 

What is Test Curve?

 

Test curve is a guide to rod power and action. It is a function of both, and it is usually taken to be the weight in pounds and ounces needed to pull the tip of a rod round to 90 degrees to the butt. It is obvious why test curve was adopted. Just like length of a rod, it is handy to have a measurement that can tell you something about the power of a rod. It can be measured in a number of ways, but simplest is to imagine a rod, clamped by its handle in a horizontal position, a few feet off the ground. With line threaded through the rings, you attach a weight close to the tip ring. Start off with 1lb on a rod assumed to be say 2lb test curve. The rod will now bend under the weight, the tip moving lower, and a curve developing throughout the rod. To measure test curve you simply add weight until the tip is at right angles to the butt section. Another option is to use a spring balance to load applied as you increasing the pull at right angles to the butt. So the test curve of the rod equals the weight applied, the load, to bring the tip to 90 degrees from the butt.

 

http://www.harrisonrods.co.uk/testcurve.htm

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