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Snag fishing


nathanhuynh
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Hi, I have always been one to fish the clip right up close to snags such as reeds or cover in the shape of trees and bushes at close and fairly long range. I hit the clip and land the rig within one foot of the snag, but the problem is that I am becoming more and more aware of the fish managing to swim me into the snags. So far only the rod in the reeds had got a fish snaged and it is easy enough to get a fish out of soft reeds but what if a fish managed to snag me up into a tree! I now fish a semi slack line with either heavy korda SUB-line or diawa sensor which sinks okay. I just don't know what to do! Should I fish open water or is there another trick? I fish all locked up with the clutch but the fish bend the rod and kite round.

thankyou

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Nathan, when fishing to known snags it's advisable to fish fully locked up, as you are, and always stay on your rod. Not near it, right beside it.

 

Make sure that the butt grip(s) are holding the rod securely and that your pod/banksticks are properly, firmly secured.

 

Fish a tight line, have your rod tip pointing directly at your hook and don't use backleads as these offer an angle in the line which any decent fish will use to it's advantage. Flying backleads are ok, though.

 

Ian

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I'll reiterate some of the points already mentioned. Fish a bowstring tight line with your rod pointing directly at your rig. I would suggest single sticks for this, plus they are more secure. Ensure you are using butt rests that grip the rod tight. The solar adjustable back rests are great for this. Also i would recommend snag ears as on aggressive takes the rod has a tendency to bounce in the rests.

 

In addition to this i like to fish a heavy lead on a lead clip but with no tail rubber (I PVA tape the arm of the clip for the cast). This means that 99% of the time the lead is ejected on the take. Not only does this leave less on the mainline to get snagged but i also find that with a heavy lead and a tight line it improves indication dramatically. Speaking of which i like to use heavy springer style indicators (I use solar quiverlocs).

 

As stated earlier don't wait for a full blooded run, hit single beeps (although i find most takes result in severe drop backs when fishing like this anyway). Don't strike the rod, simply lift it. As soon as the rod is in your hands start walking slowly backwards. This does more to steer the fish away from snags then any amount of stationary pressure on the rod would.

 

A word on your end tackle. Use common sense, and set up to suit the snags your are fishing towards. I know a lot on this forum have a real problem with leadcore, but i've always said that a landed fish is the only way to ensure it's safety. If you need the abrasion resistance of leadcore then use it. Better this than losing fish to cut offs. I've said in the past that i believe the only way to fish safely with leadcore, or any leader, is to fish it rotary style. I still believe this to be true, but in the case of snag fishing, the benefits in indication of a leadclip setup is worth the risk. Carp safety is more a case of balancing risk than anything.

 

Ensure your end tackle is up to the job. Fishing locked up tight to snags puts severe strain on every bit of your tackle from your hook, through your hooklink and mainline, all the way to your rods and reels. This is no place for scaling down. Strong hooks (I would never go smaller than a 6, and for the majority of my snag fishing i'd recommend 4s), strong abrasion resistant hooklinks, and tow rope mainline. Personally i'd suggest suffix synergy as a mainline, but there are plenty of others that do the job very well (GT80, Pro Clear, Big Game ect ect ect).

 

Hope this helps

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I'll reiterate some of the points already mentioned. Fish a bowstring tight line with your rod pointing directly at your rig. I would suggest single sticks for this, plus they are more secure. Ensure you are using butt rests that grip the rod tight. The solar adjustable back rests are great for this. Also i would recommend snag ears as on aggressive takes the rod has a tendency to bounce in the rests.

 

In addition to this i like to fish a heavy lead on a lead clip but with no tail rubber (I PVA tape the arm of the clip for the cast). This means that 99% of the time the lead is ejected on the take. Not only does this leave less on the mainline to get snagged but i also find that with a heavy lead and a tight line it improves indication dramatically. Speaking of which i like to use heavy springer style indicators (I use solar quiverlocs).

 

As stated earlier don't wait for a full blooded run, hit single beeps (although i find most takes result in severe drop backs when fishing like this anyway). Don't strike the rod, simply lift it. As soon as the rod is in your hands start walking slowly backwards. This does more to steer the fish away from snags then any amount of stationary pressure on the rod would.

 

A word on your end tackle. Use common sense, and set up to suit the snags your are fishing towards. I know a lot on this forum have a real problem with leadcore, but i've always said that a landed fish is the only way to ensure it's safety. If you need the abrasion resistance of leadcore then use it. Better this than losing fish to cut offs. I've said in the past that i believe the only way to fish safely with leadcore, or any leader, is to fish it rotary style. I still believe this to be true, but in the case of snag fishing, the benefits in indication of a leadclip setup is worth the risk. Carp safety is more a case of balancing risk than anything.

 

Ensure your end tackle is up to the job. Fishing locked up tight to snags puts severe strain on every bit of your tackle from your hook, through your hooklink and mainline, all the way to your rods and reels. This is no place for scaling down. Strong hooks (I would never go smaller than a 6, and for the majority of my snag fishing i'd recommend 4s), strong abrasion resistant hooklinks, and tow rope mainline. Personally i'd suggest suffix synergy as a mainline, but there are plenty of others that do the job very well (GT80, Pro Clear, Big Game ect ect ect).

 

Hope this helps

 

I would agree with most of this, but I don't always agree with dropping the lead. I have done a fair bit of snag fishing in recent years and dropping leads can sometimes be a death wish.

 

If a lead is dropped on the take, the fish will 9 times out of 10 rise to the surface. Now if your snags are just above the water line, the hooked fish will rise into the snags and potential create a lost fish. With the lead staying attached the fish will stay low in the water and keep your mainline away from the snags above.

 

If I remember correctly there was a large thread on snag fishing last year. There will no doubt be lots of threads on snag fishing on here so a quick search should bring some good tips.

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